Alexander Lukashenko warns of three countries planning a power takeover in Belarus

"That is, they are planning to take power by force. We see that and we will not allow it to happen"

by Sead Dedovic
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Alexander Lukashenko warns of three countries planning a power takeover in Belarus

In a press conference on Thursday, Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko said that Lithuania, Poland, and Ukraine were planning to violently overthrow his country and its government. "Regarding Belarus, I note that in Poland, Lithuania and, unfortunately, Ukraine, members of illegal armed formations are being trained and extremist cells are being tried to be created directly in the country.

Recent facts testify to this," -Lukashenko said. He pointed out that a violent takeover of power is essentially being planned, as reported by the Russian newspaper Tass. Clearly, Belarus's president is scared, or he just wants to create an even more tense environment in order to worsen relations between these countries and create an even more tense atmosphere between these countries.

Regardless of what he is trying to accomplish, things like this are not going to serve anyone in any positive way. "That is, they are planning to take power by force. We see that and we will not allow it to happen," Lukashenko concluded.

Dmitry Medvedev is angry about Great Britain

On the other hand, Dmitry Medvedev is furious with the British government and what they are doing at the moment as a result of the crisis. In response to the statement made by British Foreign Secretary James Cleverly that "Ukraine has a legitimate right to project force beyond its borders to undermine Russian power to project force into Ukraine itself," Medvedev shocked many when he declared Great Britain to be a 'legitimate military target'.

"Today, Great Britain acts as an ally of Ukraine providing it with military aid in the form of equipment and experts, i.e. it is de facto waging an undeclared war against Russia. In this case, any of its public officials (whether military or civilian, waging war) can be considered a legitimate military target," Medvedev wrote on social media.

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