Seth Meyers Targets Trump's Election Doubts Amid Legal Troubles

Trump casts doubt on 2024 election legitimacy once again.

by Nouman Rasool
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Seth Meyers Targets Trump's Election Doubts Amid Legal Troubles
© Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Speaking in a scathing monologue on Thursday's "Late Night," host Seth Meyers didn't mince his words over comments former President Donald Trump made this week regarding the 2024 election. Trump, a one-term Republican president who has a long history of not accepting the results of elections, told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel he would accept the results of the 2024 vote "if everything's honest." That, of course, would seem to be in conflict with the myriad of significant legal challenges the former commander-in-chief faces at the moment, including a trial over hush money payments described as business expenses, indictments over efforts to try to overturn the 2020 election, and charges concerning the retention of classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago estate.

To this, Meyers snapped back at Trump's conditional acceptance of election results by saying, "Dude, if everything was honest, the only results you'd have to accept would be the results of the prison talent show." That line worked overtime as a show of reinforcement of Meyers' comedic talents by drawing out the heavy implications of Trump's legal troubles and the way in which they could hang over his political future.

Trump's Controversial Caveat

Trump also added to the controversy and concern that the election is not going to be legitimate. In another interview with Time magazine, Trump stated that he may not be responsible for what goes on after such a determination, in that "if we don't win, you know, it depends.

It always depends on the fairness of an election." These pronouncements of Trump have raised questions around the stability of U.S. electoral politics and the impact of his pronouncements on public trust and safety. As legal proceedings against him continue to advance, the potential ramifications of his political interests and upcoming legal battles remain topics of media interest and public debate.

Meyers' critique is representative of a more general concern in the media and public over democratic norms and the behavior of the political elite. His humor, of course, is comic in intention, making a sharp point regarding how very grave the matters at issue were, a sure illustration of the ongoing tension between political rhetoric and judicial processes in shaping the landscape of American democracy.

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