Ann Coulter's Stark Advice to Trump: 'Pass Away'

Ann Coulter Shifts Support, Highlights GOP Presidential Dynamics.

by Nouman Rasool
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Ann Coulter's Stark Advice to Trump: 'Pass Away'
© Theo Wargo/Getty Images

In a recent turn of events, renowned conservative commentator Ann Coulter, known for her forthright opinions, has stirred the political waters with her latest remarks on former President Donald Trump. Coulter, who once stood as one of Trump's staunchest advocates, suggested a rather grim solution for what Trump could do to aid in "taking America back" – "Maybe he could die?" she proposed on a public platform.

The evolution of Coulter's stance towards Trump is noteworthy. Back in 2016, she was not only a vocal endorser of his presidential campaign but also penned the book "In Trump We Trust: E Pluribus Awesome!" Yet, this support took a sharp turn following her accusation of Trump's perceived betrayal of his voters.

Coulter expressed disillusionment over Trump's failure to fulfill his prominent campaign promise – the construction of a wall along the US-Mexico border, aimed at curtailing undocumented immigration. Over time, Coulter's criticisms of Trump have grown increasingly strident.

She has labeled him "the biggest wimp ever to serve" and "a gigantic baby" who "can barely speak English." She attributes his 2016 success primarily to his immigration policies, including the controversial Muslim travel ban and the wall project.

Coulter Praises DeSantis

Coulter expressed admiration for Trump's one-time Republican presidential rival, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis. Coulter appreciates DeSantis's approach, though he recently exited the presidential race after trailing behind Trump in the Iowa caucuses.

South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley remains as Trump's sole competitor in the race. Despite her favorable views on DeSantis, Coulter has refrained from officially endorsing any candidate in the GOP primaries. Instead, she focuses her critiques on those opposing comprehensive border reform.

In a controversial statement last year, she told Nikki Haley, an American-born politician, to "Go back to your own country." Coulter's recent criticisms of Trump have been particularly centered on immigration issues. She accuses him of potentially supporting amnesty, allowing sanctuary cities, and not committing to closing the border.

Meanwhile, Trump, who has pledged to expand the border wall and tighten asylum limits, has previously dismissed Coulter as a "has-been" and a "stone cold loser." These developments have prompted requests for comments from both Coulter and Trump.

The situation underscores the dynamic and often unpredictable nature of political alliances and opinions, particularly within the Republican Party.

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