BREAKING: King Charles III leaves hospital after prostate surgery

After rumors of problems, His Majesty is returning to Buckingham Palace

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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BREAKING: King Charles III leaves hospital after prostate surgery
© Peter Nicholls / Stringer Getty Images News

King Charles III left the London Clinic following prostate surgery last Friday and spending three nights in hospital. His Majesty returned to his residence Buckingham Palace, accompanied by his queen consort Camilla.

King Charles was expected to spend just two nights in hospital after his scheduled surgery. A source close to the royal family told The Sun newspaper that it is understood that Charles would only stay in hospital for more than two nights if some kind of unforeseen problem arose.

Buckingham Palace had announced that the King may take a break from public engagements after resigning from the London Clinic. His Majesty could remain at rest for about a month, according to those in the know. But nothing official at the moment.

Charles III received a visit from Queen Camilla. Now that the sovereign cannot fulfill his duties, it is the King's wife, supported by the heir to the throne William, who replaces him in public commitments.

Benign prostatic hyperplasia

Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a condition characterized by the increase in volume of the prostate gland. It is not a malignant neoplasm.

In fact, the increase in volume is not due to hypertrophy, but to a hyperplasia of the parenchymal and stromal component of the gland. Even if both conditions involve a global volumetric increase, the term hypertrophy indicates the increase in volume of the individual cells making up an organ, which keep their number unchanged, while hyperplasia indicates the increase in the number of cells.

King Charles
King Charles© Peter Nicholls / Stringer Getty Images News
 

In this case the increase in the number of cells takes place in the central area of the prostate, which is in contact with the prostatic urethra, or in the periurethral glands and in the transition zone.

It generally begins with the development of microscopic nodules made up mainly of stromal and parenchymal elements, which over the years, increasing in number and size, compress and distort the prostatic urethra producing an obstruction that hinders the flow of urine.

King Charles
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