How Charlie Sheen Understands Matthew Perry's Battle with Addiction

Charlie Sheen opens up about shared struggles and bonds.

by Nouman Rasool
SHARE
How Charlie Sheen Understands Matthew Perry's Battle with Addiction
© Rich Polk/GettyImages

In a poignant revelation, Charlie Sheen, best known for his role in "Two and a Half Men," has expressed a deep sense of connection to the late Matthew Perry’s battles with addiction. The Hollywood actor, who himself has been nearly six years sober, found a reflection of his own struggles in Perry’s journey towards sobriety.

Speaking candidly in an interview with Deadline on December 15, Sheen shared his thoughts after reading Matthew Perry's 2022 memoir, "Friends, Lovers, and the Big Terrible Thing." The book, which delves into the "Friends" star's arduous path to sobriety, struck a chord with Sheen.

“I could relate to so much of it,” he admitted, acknowledging the shared experiences of struggle and obsession that mark the journey of recovery. The unexpected passing of Perry at 54, attributed to the acute effects of ketamine, resonated deeply with Sheen.

“It was really sad when that happened,” he said, reflecting on the fragility of life and the close parallels with his own experiences. Sheen, who himself faced a life-threatening overdose in 1998, felt a personal connection to Perry’s narrative, highlighting the challenges and choices faced by those on the road to recovery.

Perry: A Special Soul

Sheen, 58, reminisced about his interactions with Perry, describing him as “lovely, smart, and funny”. He fondly recalled Perry's inclusive nature and his ability to engage with people beyond himself.

“He was a special cat,” Sheen reflected, expressing a wish to have known Perry more intimately, not with the intention to influence change but to share in his journey. Perry's untimely death on October 28 in Los Angeles, where he was found unresponsive in his hot tub, has been a topic of much discussion.

The Los Angeles County Medical Examiner's office concluded that his death, ruled as an accident, was primarily due to ketamine effects, with drowning, coronary artery disease, and the impacts of buprenorphine listed as contributing factors.

The toxicology report revealed Perry was 19 months sober at his passing and had recently undergone ketamine infusion therapy for depression and anxiety. Sheen's reflections on Perry's life and struggles underscore the shared challenges faced by many in the limelight.

Their stories shed light on the complex journey of addiction and sobriety, resonating with many who face similar battles.

Matthew Perry
SHARE